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JJ-Knitter

conversion formula for demand to constant O2 setting

9 posts in this topic

Hi everyone!

 

Can anyone tell me a rough guide to settings when changing from a pulsed 'demand' type portable O2 to running off a 50' hose and cannula connected to a stationary liquid O2 reervoir? I'm finding using the portable around the house tiring (it's carried off either a shoulder strap or waist belt) and kinda chilly too. ;) My doctor says 2-3 LPM on the portable, but what's that convert to on the stationary? I'm supposed to be using O2 at night too, but my hubby doesn't like cuddling up to the portable any more than I do and the dog just hates it when I shove it out of bed onto her head in the middle of the night! :P

 

Thanks a lot!

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Hi JJ-Knitter,

 

My mother has her portable set on pulse 4.0 because she is walking (and the pulse setting also helps the liquid O2 last longer).

When she is at home, her activity level is much less. so her setting is lower. For her night/day setting, we have her concentrator set at 3.5, which works well for her.

 

Hope this helps.

Hugs, Susie


Special Hugs,

 

Susie Kraft

ISN Support Specialist

ISN Chat Host

International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

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My range is 4-6... 6 with activity, 4 with rest. I'm supposed to use 5 with sleep at least that's what my nighttime oximetry test said... but when I took the test I used a 50 ft hose which with that length weakens the pressure so if the tank says 5 liters you're really getting 4 liters.

 

I got myself one of the pulse oximeters so I can be sure I'm getting the correct amount of oxygen. They're kind of expensive but if you itemize your taxes you can ride it off on your taxes as health expense.

 

peanut


You can deprive the body but the soul needs chocolate

my HMO makes me wear a helmet...

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Hi peanut

 

Where did you get your pulse gizmo?

 

I find the 02 a guessing game depending on what I'm doing. I usually can tell my breath but know this would be a better measurement of 02 diffusion.

 

Thanks for the info

Colleen

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Thanks, everyone! The info does help. I thought continuous would probably need to be lower than demand, but I hadn't thought about the 50' hose weakening the pressure at the delivery end. That would make a difference, especially when I'm upstairs. I've been tending to have the settings wherever they make me feel comfortable, but I recently read a couple of articles about too much O2 damaging the lungs, long-term. Of course they don't suggest how much is too much and there is also the counter argument that the benefits out-weigh the risks for us. :blink: I've been wondering about getting a pulse oximeter too. Maybe the insurance company would cover it if I had a prescription for it.

 

We've got a bright sunny day, so that's going to be my mood. Y'all have a good one. :D

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My insurance wouldn't cover a pulse oximeter cause you can buy it without a script. Bummer. I hope yours covers it...

 

peanut


You can deprive the body but the soul needs chocolate

my HMO makes me wear a helmet...

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JJ,

I would highly recommend talking to the company that supplies your oxygen concentrator. I use a 50' hose on my main concentrator and was told that was the maximum length that could be used for my size concentrator. They did raise my flowmeter setting 0.5 lpm but that was due to me living a mile high (lower pressure, less O2), not due to the length of the hose.

 

I bought my pulse oximeter on-line and love it. It's taught me a lot about my O2 needs, much more than I've learned from any tests or doctor visits. Like Peanut, my insurance didn't cover the costs of it, but the money I spent on it has been well worth it.

 

Big Hugs,


Janey Willis

ISN Support Specialist

(Retired) ISN Assistant Webmaster

(Retired) ISN News Director

(Retired) ISN Technical Writer for Training Manuals

International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

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Colleen and JJ-Knitter,

 

I got my husband an oximeter about a year ago on E-bay.

My sister-in-law asked if I could/would get her one also, so I went to ebay again, but the prices had gone up...alot!

If a person types into their search engines: oximeter , it will bring up several where you can locate them.

When I did that and found one... about 2 months ago, for only $65. With it, we were also sent a carrying case and a thermometer, which I thought was pretty reasonable!

 

One thing to note with oximeters, though... I believe it's recommended that alkaline batteries be used for ultimate use.

 

Good luck withlocating oximeters.

Hugs, Susie


Special Hugs,

 

Susie Kraft

ISN Support Specialist

ISN Chat Host

International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

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I've got altitude attitude too. Last time I was at sea level, I felt like a new(er) woman!

 

I'm going to look for an oximeter too. Thanks for all the helpful experience-based advice. I need to use the forum more!

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