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Hi Jensue, It sounds like you didn't really get any answers to your questions, and even ended up with a few more! It's a hard decison to make re deciding to be referred to someone else. Could get someone better or could get someone worse!

Lizzie

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Jensue,

Regarding the carpal tunnel. I had that a few years ago in my right wrist. I had worn the wrist brace at night for over a year with no good results. I finally decided to have the surgery and I have to say it was the best decision I could have made. I've had absolutely no more trouble with my wrist and recovery from surgery was pretty quick.

Good luck on what you decide.

 

Sherion

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Hello Jensue, I am glad your doctor said you could increase your Norvasc in the fall. It might really help you with some of your symptoms.

Carpal tunnel syndrome can be pretty rough. I had severe bi-lateral carpal tunnel. I couldn't function. The pain never went away and the numbness was to the point that I couldn't feel when I was holding or grasping on to something. I also wore the braces which kept my hands in a very uncomfortable position. I was still in pain. So after 3 months I had surgery on the left hand. I watched the entire proceedure. When my hand was recovering the next several weeks the right hand also started feeling better. By untrapping the tendons in my left hand it released the pressure going up my arm and around to the other side. So I never have had any surgery on my right hand. I am right handed so I am glad I chose the surgery for the other hand first. The proceedure is quite simple. I won't go into details unless you need me to private message you. When your pain can't be eased you will make the decision. Nothing was easing my pain and numbness or tingling.


Strength and Warmth,

Sheryl

 

Sheryl Doom

ISN Support Specialist

(Retired) ISN Chat Moderator

International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

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Hi Jensue,

 

I hope this whole ordeal can be over and to your advantage.... soon! I know how much this alll adds to your stress and that, in turn exacerbates the raynauds. Stress is really horrible for our illnesses :(

 

I had carpal tunnel surgery done on each of my wrists and the second I felt the release during the surgery, the pain was over instantly! My carpal tunnel came on over a period of only a month, which made me think it might be something else because I had always heard it happened over a slower period of time. However, when the neurologist did the nerve conduction test, he couldn't believe it was, in fact, at its most advanced stage! Go figure!

Although it has returned (the carpal tunnel), the pain isn't the issue it was the first go-round. Also, the sclero induced the Carpal tunnel!

 

I wish you nothing but the best with all you are going through. Hope it' s soon so that you can de-stress.

 

Hugs,

Susie


Special Hugs,

 

Susie Kraft

ISN Support Specialist

ISN Chat Host

International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

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Sheryl I find it is my right hand that is the worst is I suppose if I do decide to have it done it will be that one first. The swelling on my hands seems to go up and down at the moment but whenever they swell up more it kicks off the tingling pain & numbness even more, I have also noticed that my thumbs seem weaker so wondered if that was linked to it.

I will give the extra Amlodipine a try in September to see if it will help improve my Raynaud's.

Susie you are so right about the stress exacerbating the Raynaud's, but I also find it affects my stomach issues as well.

 

I am just hoping that the consultants report contain enough so that the OH doctor will be prepared to support the application of IHR. My general practitioner has already given him a report which is fully supportive so it's wait and see time.

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Jensue, you mentioned your thumb also hurting. The puffy padding at the base of your thumb can also be affected. If your thumb starts having much pain all the time. Pain that really doesn't go away I would seriously think strongly on surgery. The muscle or sturcture in the pading of the palm below the thumb can go entirely flat. Once that happens, for any length of time it will never go back to normal again. You entire palm will be flat. Not to scare you but watch where and how much that thumb bothers you. My girlfriend has one flat palm and one regular palm. It looks quite strange. Plus, she has no strength in that hand, even after surgery. Our hands are important take care of them. You may find you have better circulation and don't have any new raynalds attacks. I just thought about it. I haven't had any since my surgery. I just assumed it was from the Norvasc. Never entered my mind that the surgery may have helped that also.


Strength and Warmth,

Sheryl

 

Sheryl Doom

ISN Support Specialist

(Retired) ISN Chat Moderator

International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

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Sheryl I've just had a look at my palms just below my thumbs and they do look much flatter than they used to. I find opening jars etc very difficult and also doing things like peeling the vegetables because holding them firmly enough is an issue.

 

I suppose if the nerves are getting trapped then some of the blood vessels may also be getting trapped.

 

Jensue

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