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Sheryl

Today's Doctor's Visit's

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Went to the doctor’s office today for a checkup on my frozen shoulder. Proper name adhesive capsulitis. I have been going through therapy since the end of March. I am about 90 percent unfrozen. I’m still having pain in tendons and bones popping and bothering me. So, I had a Cortisone shot today and was told it would hurt for a few days and then with in the next two weeks I should have more range of motion and pain and swelling should have diminished. We will see. I hope I can do the exercises and start lifting my small weights to get some strength back.

My next visit was with my family physician. He drew fasting blood last week to recheck my cholesterol levels since starting on Zocor a few months back. Triglycerides and cholesterol levels are much better. But, I do not get to stop taking the Zocor. This blood work confirmed that I have some diabetes 2 issues going on. Signs of it 4 months ago but the cholesterol needed to be brought under control. So, now my doctor wants me to take Avandia. I haven’t had time to look it up as I just returned home and am going to call it a night soon. If anyone knows anything about Avandia or takes this medication please let me know. I was hoping to get off some of my medicines instead my physicians keep adding things to my regimen. Then I’m told to try to lose weight. Of course the medicines cause weight gain. HAH! Enough from me for the time being.


Strength and Warmth,

Sheryl

 

Sheryl Doom

ISN Support Specialist

(Retired) ISN Chat Moderator

International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

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Hi Sheryl

 

I don't know anything about Avandia sorry, I can't help you with that question...but it sure sounds like you've had quite the doctors visit!! I hope the cortisone does what it's supposed to so you can get some relief from that shoulder. I have a friend I work with that has diabetes and he has to stay on a strict diet to help control it (but I don't know what it is, I'll have to ask him about that and see if he knows anything about Avandia)....I'm curious, did your doctor mention anything about a restricted diet to control your sugars to you (not for any weight loss just to keep the sugars where they need to be) or did he just want to give you more pills? Hope you get your rest now!


Sending good wishes your way!

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Hi Sheryl,

 

I've been thinking about you...wondering how youare doing. Now, I know B)

 

Sounds really strange...that you would be told that you will have pain for a few days and then have more range of motion, doesn't it?!

I hope the dr's right...Having a good range of motion, as welll as swelling diminished...that would really be good!

Yup...I think you will be able to lift the lighter weights../.at least for a couple of weeks...my experience, anyway.

 

I'm sorry you were not able to cut back on scripts, Sheryl.

 

I don't know anything about Avandia...Sory :huh:

 

Hugs,

 

Susie


Special Hugs,

 

Susie Kraft

ISN Support Specialist

ISN Chat Host

International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

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Avandia is a thiazolidinediones (TZDs). It attaches to the insulin cells to help their response. There is the potential for this drug to cause you to have low blood sugar at times. Frequently people are started on Metformin (Glucophage) first. It decreases the glucose created by your liver, thus lowering your blood glucose. Some people have gastric problems with this when they first start. A minimum dose is started and increase it over several days. Metformin is not likely to cause low blood sugar. It is also helpful in weight loss.

 

The key is diet and exercise. If you eat high glycemic foods, those that increase your blood glucose you are not likely to have any success in controlling your sugar. These foods, as I'm sure you can guess are the sweets. Foods you would not guess can be just as bad. The easiest way to determine, though not precisly, are the "white" foods, potatoes, bread, crackers, and such. Read lables to watch the carbohydrates.

 

Diabetes is a subject that too many doctors know too little about. You should try to keep your blood glucose from ever being high. It creates problems later on. Doctors do not all agree on what is too high, what you should eat, which medicines to use and what I think is most important of all is home testing your glucose. Do yourself a favor and start taking care of it now. Damage can be done in the beginning. Don't expect the doctor to tell you exactelly what to do. You will have to work it out yourself. Glucose levels can change in a matter of minutes.

 

I wish you the best in this.

Betty

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Sheryl,

I am on a statin for cholesterol and have found that once you are on it, you are a lifer. The only thing that happens is that you may change pills if you have a reaction to a particular pill. I changed from Lipitor to Crestor because I had a reaction after several years on Lipitor. I do recommend that if you are having both cholesterol and diabetes issues that rather than try to figure out a healthy diet on your own, that you meet with a nutritionist who can help you navigate the very complicated waters of a diet that will meet the needs of both of your conditions. Things have changed radically in the way diabetics must view food and how they should eat and how often. It would be in your best interests and some health insurance plans actually may pay for the consultation.

 

I know that this is a very complicated thing to have to deal with on top of health issues that you already have to face. I am sorry that you have these extra complications. Once you get the diet part resolved you will surely feel better. Good luck and I hope that you are feeling well and healthy soon!


Smurfette

 

Chocolate, It isn't just for breakfast anymore!

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Sheryl:

 

Glad you got the Cortisone shot; you'll see how much better you are going to be. Sorry to hear about the diabetes diagnosis. What brought that about? Does it run in your family? Hopefully it can be controlled by diet and that they try that first. Keep us updated.


Tru

 

It is what it is...........

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Sheryl,

 

You had an interesting visit with your doctor to say the least. I, too, was wondering the diabetes connection, what brought it on? Let us know how your shoulder improves from the cortisone shot. I've learned so much about medications and medical symptoms from this board. It helps me when I go to my doctor's appointments. I'll be seeing my rheumatologist this tuesday. We'll see how my check-up goes. :unsure:

 

I hope you've recuperated and rested from your doctor's visit. Keep us updated.

 

 

Hugs,

Razz


Live well, Laugh often, Love much

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Sorry to hear you get to have another disease thrown in with everything else you have to deal with. I hope the shot works. My husband has shoulder problems and has had one surgery and another pending as the first one didn't work. He has had the shots 3 times and none have every worked for him so I hope yours is more successful.

 

I too would be interested in the diabetes issue. Is this someting else that sclero can bring on or is it because it runs in your family or you had signs of diabetes before?

 

Warm hugs,

 

Peggy

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Thank you for your replies. I haven't had time to do much research on diabetes but, there are many diabetes and scleroderma medical sites on this forum, that I will soon be checking out. I remember my doctor saying something about blood sugar being 106. To many things were going on yesterday for me to retain all the information. I assumed the diabetes was from the scleroderma. Or from the weight gained from medications I have been taking since diagnosis. I couldn't loose more than a pound or two the past 10 months, I knew that something else was preventing me from the weight loss. Four months ago the doctor put me on the Zocor to bring down all the sugars aparrently the medicine hasn't worked well except for the lowering of Triglycerides. I am not really sure about what this medication for the diabetes is suppose to do in the next several months. I have one Aunt that has diabetes. She was 87 when diagnosed so I don't think that is much to go on for diabetes running in our family, she is now 90 and still has her sweets daily. Apparently we have several autoimmunine diseases that are running through my mother and myself and a few cousins with crones disease. Other than that I am the only one with the majority of illness's. I thought I had changed my eating habits to help my system use and remove food properly. Don't eat this it causes heartburn, don't eat this is causes stomach and bowel issues. Don't eat this it is bad for colesterol now don't eat things because of diabetes. UGG! Fruit and grains only go so far. I guess I should try to make an appointment with a nutritionist. I am not sure what to eat at this point in my life. I'm sure processed foods like lunchmeat are out of the question too. I can only take so much Tuna and Shrimp in sandwiches. Opps! Now I can't have the bread. Yikes! I diffenately need a nutritionist to sort out a schedule for me. I have to laugh about what is happening. I have sleep apnea and my doctor says lose about 15 pounds and maybe I won't have the daily fatigue. I work out and bike and do everything to keep physically fit. Maybe it really is the whole scleroderma thing turning me inside out. I will get down to serious learning next week when I have an empty house. I will have 5 families here for the next 3 days. Some have already arrived. Nine children under 5. Should be loads of fun. Total caos and it isn't suppose to rain until after 6 tonight and beautiful for the next several days. Whew! Things are looking up. I'll be checking in. I hope everyone has a nice weekend doing what ever it is you like to do.


Strength and Warmth,

Sheryl

 

Sheryl Doom

ISN Support Specialist

(Retired) ISN Chat Moderator

International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

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Wow Sheryl,

 

Sounds like you're going to need roller skates this week-end!! :D

I'll be thinking of you. Take care.

 

Christy


Love makes the world go around!

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Oh Sheryl I am so, so sorry to hear you are having to up meds - I have had the same kind of news the past fews as I've gotten started down the Sclero road and each new specialist has found something else.

 

But real quick - on the diabetes. If the doctor didn't give you a blood glucose meter - get one. Monitor your blood sugars several times a day (before eating, 20 minutes after and 2 hrs after) and keep a log. It will help you immensley in figuring out which foods effect YOU! A nutritionist can help a lot but we are ultimately individuals and different foods effect different people in different ways. Also they will give you a target range for your blood sugar (usually 90 - 120) but again you may find that you feel better at 80 then you do at 120 or vice versa.

 

There are many drug choices too so keep that in mind. For my husband exercise one night will lower his blood sugar the next morning by 30 points.

 

good luck - it is a hard illness to regulate but once you get it under control it will be easier to keep it there.

 

Shari (Mutsy)


Shari (AKA Mutsy)

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Type 1 is an autoimmune problem and it is not caused by scleroderma. Adding to the confusion terminology has not been agreed upon by the medical community. They are now finding more adults are diagnosed type 1. Immunine system tests are what is needed to diagnose type 1. Many doctors advocates starting insulin as soon as type 1 is diagnosed. Children usually have a quick onset and insulin is a must.

 

Type 2 diabetes is not related to scleroderma and is not an autoimmune problem. Very short way of saying it, either your body does not produce good insulin or is not using what it produces.

 

These 2 types of diabetes are completely different diseases. They are alike in that blood glucose is higher than is normal. Controlling the glucose is the goal and diet, exercing and glucose lowering drugs is the remedy for both types.

Betty

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Hi, Sheryl. Sorry to hear you have yet another thing to face. As you know, I am not a doctor, but both my mother, my ex and his father all suffered from type 2 diabetes. The American Diabetes society provides excellent information on diet and nutrition which is useful even if you don't have diabetes. I believe you can get the booklets free if you are diabetic. While Betty is right that your scleroderma hasn't caused type 2 diabetes directly, the inactivity which results in suffering from a chronic illness can be a contributing factor. I know you have always been an active person so it is even more difficult as your metabolism is used to burning calories and now it is not. You have to be very careful not to start randomly eliminating food categories, such as bread, even though it may seem like the thing to do. In earlier times, diabetics were often put on high protein/fat diets. They have since learned that this can actually create a temporary diabetic condition. What you need is the appropriate balance of wholesome, nutritious foods. Substitute refined carbohydrates with whole grains and fresh fruits, for example. Seeing a nutritionist is an excellent idea.


Warm wishes,

Jefa

 

Carrie Maddoux

(Retired)ISN Sclero Forums Support Specialist

(Retired)ISN Sclero Forums UK Chat Host

International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

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Hi Sheryl

Sorry to hear about another problem for you but hopefully you'll get it sorted soon & feel better.

My mum has type 2 and she is on tablets for it, she is doing well and finds it quite easy to sort out her levels by eating sensibly. She is on a different medication after having some issues with metformin though. She tends to have sugar free drinks etc but does still have some sweet foods (she has a sweet tooth) which she really enjoys, having smaller portions seems to have helped her.

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