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Capillaroscopy

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Capillaroscopy.

 

Capillaroscopy is the most reliable way to distinguish between primary and secondary Raynaud's phenomenon through identification of an early pattern of systemic sclerosis. (PubMed) M. Cutolo. Best Pract Res Clin Rheumatol. Dec 2008. (Also see: Capillaroscopy)

 

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Janey Willis

ISN Support Specialist

(Retired) ISN Assistant Webmaster

(Retired) ISN News Director

(Retired) ISN Technical Writer for Training Manuals

International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

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Hi Everyone,

 

I am curious.....can anyone see their abnormal capillaries with their own eyes? I know that the doctor looked with the microscope at Gareth's fingers and didn't see anything abnormal, but when it does get bad, can you see the abnormality without a microscope? I was told in May that he is starting to show signs of Raynaud's. Thanks.

 

Take care, Everyone.

Margaret

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Hi Margaret

 

I was told, yes, when it's advanced the doctor can see the abnormalities without a microscope...mind you they know what they're looking for too...can't say I'd personally be able to tell.


Sending good wishes your way!

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Hi Margaret, My rheumatologist could see that my nailfolds were abnormal without any aids (other than his specs!). I can see that I have nailfold haemorrhages, but although the area around the nailfold looks very red, can't make out much else!

 

Lizzie

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Margaret,

My rheumatologist put some salve on the cuticle area and looked through a handheld magnifying glass. I tried it myself but couldn't really see anything; but it was a cheap magnifying glass and old eyes. :)

 

Big Hugs,


Janey Willis

ISN Support Specialist

(Retired) ISN Assistant Webmaster

(Retired) ISN News Director

(Retired) ISN Technical Writer for Training Manuals

International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

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I'm like Lizzie, my rheumatologist could see with just his eyes, he though showed me with some clear gel and a small handheld microscope (don't know it's correct name). The area around the cuticles are very red and shiny and you can actually see broken blood vessels. My cuticles are very thick and dry and no matter what I do they always look ragged and split.

 

Jensue

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<<My cuticles are very thick and dry and no matter what I do they always look ragged and split.>>

 

Hi, Everyone ,

 

Thanks for the responses. That's interesting to know. I don't have sclero but I have one nail that has what looks like very tiny broken blood vessels at the top of the fingernail. I assume it's a varicose vein.....my legs are like road maps!!! Jensue....my cuticles look the same. Straight vaseline doesn't even help them!!!

 

Take care, Everyone.

Margaret

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My nailfolds are red, thick, jagged, and layered cuticles with brown dots in them... My old rheumatologist used oil and a magnifying glass... said they were irregular and dilated.

 

New rheumatologist...I told him what old rheumatologist said, he tried to look at mine with a old, blurry, ruler looking thing that he pulled out of his pocket?? lol whatever!

 

I sometimes can see them when they dilate more. I am taking an anatomy and physiology class, when we do the cardiovascular system, I am going to check my nailfolds out in the lab just for fun to see what they look like now.

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Margaret,

 

My rheumatologist used a magnifying glass to look at mine. She said they were abnormal. They are red , but in the last two months I started getting white spots in my nails that you can see. I am not sure if it has anything to do nail beds. I have raynauds bad.

 

hugs,

Nina Lynn

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Hi everyone!

 

My rheumatologist used a microscope and showed me the "tortuous" capillaries.

 

I'm with the rest of you on the state of the cuticles and the area directly below them. Also, my nails have gotten very thin, have ridges, and split lengthwise all too often. My hands look like brick-layers'! :P

 

Margaret, I get those funny little red marks, but on my toenails, not my hands. Very strange~


Jeannie McClelland

(Retired) ISN Director of Support Services

(Retired) ISN Sclero Forums Manager

(Retired) ISN Blog Manager

(Retired) ISN Assistant News Guide

(Retired) ISN Artist

International Scleroderma Network

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