Shelley Ensz

Natural methods to relieve pain

24 posts in this topic

Welcome to the Sclero Forums, urangel. Many of us are with you in the S.S. Waiting for a Diagnosis boat. I believe the average time for receiving a diagnosis has been reported on the board as six years for a woman. By those statistics, I should be getting mine in 2009 - I have something to look forward to then. :D

 

The important thing is to make sure that your symptoms are being treated as they occur, with or without a diagnosis.


Warm wishes,

Jefa

 

Carrie Maddoux

(Retired)ISN Sclero Forums Support Specialist

(Retired)ISN Sclero Forums UK Chat Host

International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

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Barefut

 

Making one with the pain, hilarious! :lol:

 

Ignoring the pain makes it very VERY angry! :angry:

 

In this country they're running a really annoying commercial for the anti plague benefits of a certain chewing gum. It involves an ordinary man, dressed in white, fighting the air as you can't see the plaque he's really fighting while other weirdos play small musical instruments to the tune of fighting the air. We could do this for pain, we could all dress in white jackets, the ones that strap up at the back, and beat the invisible pain, cathartic! Anyone play musical instruments? We could syncronise a multi continental pain bashing ceremony.

 

Transport home would be provided courtesy of the local asylums.

 

Amanda


Amanda Thorpe

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Amanda,

 

Glad to make you laugh. But I'm serious! But 'becoming one with the pain' is really reserved for when something is unbearable and there either are no pain meds or you have exhausted all possibilities of pain meds.

 

When I was a teenager, I was diagnosed with endometriosis after suffering for years with debilitating menstrual cramps. I would lie in bed for 3 days and cry. When all my tears were gone, I would get up and pace the house in circles telling myself there wasn't really any pain there. That didn't work. Then I'd go back to bed and meditate on the pain, concentrating on it until I became one with it and weirdly, this worked as a distraction and made it bearable for a short time.

 

After my endometriosis diagnosis, I was prescribed loestrin and the cramps all but disappeared! I will never forget suffering through that and all that I tried to make it bearable. That level of constant pain is almost indescribable; right up there with migraines, kidney stones and childbirth.

 

But the 'can't get out of my chair, hurts to walk, hands won't work, take the elevator, everyday pain' which frustrates you to tears and makes you wish pain medication were sold like catnip, requires some strategy to overcome and that's why this is a great thread! Thanks Shelley.


Take care,

Barefut

 

Serena Justis

ISN Blogger

International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

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Hi Barefut,

 

I totally agree with 'becoming one with the pain'. Part of that entails accepting it, instead of fighting it. The acceptance immediately reduces stress, lowering the pain level. It's a relief, just in and of itself, if you ask me. That might be part of the miracle action of some pills, because we sigh with relief, knowing we've finally done something about the pain...and the relief itself is a major factor in calming the hypersensitive nerve endings.

 

I also taught myself self-hypnosis over 30 years ago, to deal with pain. That's where I learned the power of intense concentration -- which can either increase or decrease pain, depending on which angle we are concentrating on. Hypnosis and self-hypnosis is often considered dangerous in the wrong hands, so people frequently have a frightful response to the idea. However, any time we are totally engrossed in something and unaware of our other surroundings -- for many people, watching TV is a good example, or driving for miles but not remembering any of it (road hypnosis) -- shows what a natural phenomenon it really is. And like everything, it can be used for good (relaxation or pain reduction, for example) or for evil (the stage hypnotist making you cluck like a chicken and lay an egg, to your ever-lovin' embarrassment).

 

But it was foolish of me to study about it and learn it from library books. If I had it to do over again, I would read medical abstracts about it first (its usefulness and its dangers and limitations) and consult a professional and learn it from them. It was just the rage in the 70's along with all sorts of other, more dangerous and more mind-bending phenomena.

 

Getting back to the point, though -- really becoming totally engrossed in any activity -- such as drawing, painting, sewing, cooking, crafts, reading, music...for me serves as a mini form of hypnosis and when used along with relabeling, such as acknowledging the pain but greeting it as an "interesting sensation" or "another body part present and accounted for" or "an area that needs some TLC at the moment", helps to defang the vicious pain tiger and turn it into a more malleable pussycat, for me. (As a side note, I've found TV is too passive of an activity for me, probably due to commercial breaks that make me come up for air more often, so it actually seems to increase my pain level.)

 

Distraction is not a cure-all, of course. It's just another tool in the disease management kit, and best used in combination with many (or even all!) of the outstanding ideas above.

 

And if it is a new or unusual pain, it is something we should be dealing with by calling the doctor, not by trying to ignore it or overcome it. Of course!


Warm Hugs,

 

Shelley Ensz

Founder and President

International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

Hotline and Donations: 1-800-564-7099

 

The most important thing in the world to know about scleroderma is sclero.org.

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Pain is a hard thing to overcome. I think that regular exercise is a big part of feeling an overall sense of health, but sometimes it can leave me feeling sore and stiff. I try to deal with that by taking a sitz bath and relaxing. I have constant pain between my shoulder blades so usually a heating pad works wonders.

 

Thanks for the great ideas!

erin


*WestCoast*

 

********

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Hey! I play penny whistle (and an oatmeal box bodhran) and the hubby says I'm ready for the white coat. Can I join the intercontinental anti-pain band?

 

Jeannie


Jeannie McClelland

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Hi, a bit late in my posting but I wish to share the remedy for pain relief, I have used, since the birth of my twins, 36 years ago.

 

Most of the ladies will know about deep breathing. I was too scared with my first born to do it properly.

 

I had NO pain with the twins, yes, I could feel what was going on but without pain. Since then, no matter what pain I have, it works so long as I do it the moment the pain kicks in. I deep breathe. It's no good if I let the pain take over though, as I don't seem to relax properly. I also find it takes away RLS (restless leg syndrome), migraine, neuralgia, cramp, toothache. I don't worry about aches though, just let them take their course. I don't take pain killers, I have too many adverse reactions to them.


Take care.

Lynne

 

A trouble shared is halved, a joy shared is doubled

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Please make sure you get the right diagnostic before taking so many medications that can make yourself worse. There are so many doctor already very aware for scleroderma symptoms even it is has a lot of types and not everybody get the same sign... but my experiences; in the early stages I only had problem with swollen fingers and general fatigue and for 2 years doctors can not find anything wrong in my normal blood test.

 

But with the autoimmune blood screening test you may be able to find out. Have you done this?

 

Now I am living with it for 10 years after being diagnosed in May 1999; but the signs started in 1997.

 

Hope you can find out what is really wrong with you and get a good treatment.

 

Bless you,

 

karin

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This is a great thread. I agree with so many of everyone's ideas already. I have had MCTD for 10 years now and the things that keep me going are:

1)EXERCISE- Water year round indoor pool. Varied exercise of all types with A LOT of stretching. Even on bad days, this will make me better. REALLY bad days, just can't do anything .

2) HEAT- rice pads, heat massage, hot tub, all good for pain

3) DISTRACTION- anything that keeps you engrossed, even a grandchild to painting to gardening.

4) FRIENDS-laughter

Susie54

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