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pieski

Feet

13 posts in this topic

I swear it feels like my feet are dying. Just from the balls to the tip of my toes. They get so cold it feels like they are burning. Last night I had socks on and my feet under the blankets and I had to get toe warmers. I live in Phoenix, so its not like it is freezing cold here. Has anyone else had similar experiences and if so, what do you do to alleviate the problem?


~ Teresa~

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Cold feet at bedtime are just awful!

 

I do much the same as you but I try too make sure my feet are very warm before I even get to bed. Sometimes I also try to warm them up in warm water and dry them and put socks which have been warming on the radiators.

 

I'm sure you will get lots of replies with useful tips.

 

Stay Warm

 

Jensue

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Hi Teresa,

 

I'm with you, my feet are usually the coldest of all and most prone to Raynaud's attacks. But I'm in Minnesota and perhaps thus used to dealing with cold, more than most people.

 

I often wear two layers of very warm socks. Sometimes I get so chilled it feels like my bones are even cold; and then the best way to warm up for me is a long, warm (not too hot) bath, since even too much heat can bring on Raynaud's attacks.

 

I also keep an old dishpan nearby and use it to soak my feet. But really, staying warm all over, from head to toe, is the best approach to deal with cold feet. You can also make or buy heatsocks (grain filled bags that can be reheated in the microwave) but they are not to be used when you are going to be falling asleep.

 

Oh, and my favorite trick is to throw my (grain filled) sleeping pillow and blanket in the dryer right before bedtime (or naptime). What a cozy treat; and putting the warmed (not hot, again not starting any fires here!) pillow over bundled up feet...it is wonderful! Top that off with a nice cup of a sleepy-time tea (no caffeine, it makes Raynaud's worse) and it is pure bliss. See our Raynaud's page for more ideas, of course.

 

May you be blessed with cozy, toasty, warm feet tonight!


Warm Hugs,

 

Shelley Ensz

Founder and President

International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

Hotline and Donations: 1-800-564-7099

 

The most important thing in the world to know about scleroderma is sclero.org.

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Hi Teresa,

 

It is absolutely miserable...having cold feet! When they are cold, the whole body feels cold!

 

I also have the same trouble, but as with Shelley, being from a colder climate...I also have had to adapt.

 

The ladies have offered great suggestions and I can't think of anything else.

I just wanted to let you know that I too, empathize with what you are going through.


Special Hugs,

 

Susie Kraft

ISN Support Specialist

ISN Chat Host

International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

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Hi Teresa,

 

I have problems with cold feet (and hands) every winter! My feet don't burn but they do get numb where I can't even feel them. If I didn't look down and see them, I'd swear they were gone. Shelley's ideas are great for quick and long-term warming up. I try to stay indoors but even my house feels cold. So I take my pellet filled bean bag, put it in the microwave for 1 min. 50 secs. and either hold it until my hands warm up or put my feet on it. I hope you find everyone's ideas helpful!

 

I will be sending warm thoughts your way!

 

Hugs,

Razz


Live well, Laugh often, Love much

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Hi Teresa,

 

I think we own the corner on the true meaning of cold feet. Sometimes my feet are a dark purple and hurt!! I have trained my dogs to keep my feet warm at night and sometimes my terrier will sit by them to keep them warm if my feet are on the floor. She taught herself that. Layers of socks always help too. There are many good suggestions here for you to choose from and I'm sure many more will show up. Take care.

 

With gentle thoughts,

 

Judy


A happy heart is good medicine.

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I wrap rice bags warmed up in microwave and wrap feet under the blankets. Its nice and stays warm for an hour at least. Susie54

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I have a question regarding cold feet and Raynaud's. I have heard that you can get Raynaud's in your toes but how about in the heals of the foot? My heals seem to get colder than my toes and turn a deep, reddish purple. Is it possible? I must remember to ask my rheumatologist but I don't see him for three more weeks.

Thanks for any ideas and help.

 

Sherion

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Hi Sherion,

 

That's a good question. As I understand it, you can get Raynaud's anywhere. We have a photo of Raynaud's of the feet in our Scleroderma Symptom Slide Show.

 

And our What is Raynaud's? page explains that you can even get attacks in the lungs (when breathing in cold air) and in the nipples (which can cause extremely painful breastfeeding.)

 

I get the worst attacks in my toes, but also in my fingers, mouth, tongue, lips (etc.)...so I need to be a bit cautious when eating cold foods, and give it a rest if the Raynaud's kicks in.

 

If they never go through the white phase, it might be cyanosis; you can have peripheral cyanosis without having Raynaud's. So it is something for the doctor to evaluate. With Raynaud's, there is generally a phase of complete absence of circulation, which turns the tissues dead white. When there is still a little blood there, but poorly oxygenated, then it may be the second phase of Raynaud's, or cyanosis due to another underlying cause.

 

I think. But of course, I am not a doctor, I have no medical training at all, I may be wrong (I often am!), it's impossible to evaluate or diagnose things over the internet, consult your doctor, and this free advice is worth about exactly how much you paid for it... :blink:


Warm Hugs,

 

Shelley Ensz

Founder and President

International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

Hotline and Donations: 1-800-564-7099

 

The most important thing in the world to know about scleroderma is sclero.org.

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Thanks Shelley!!! I will try and remember to ask my rheumatologist at my next appointment but it is nice to have your opinion! I didn't realize you could have Raynauds in so many different places. I thought it was just in the hands and toes. that's really interesting. Now I'm going to check out the sites you gave me. Thanks again.

 

Sherion

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Nose. Yes, Raynaud's in the nose. My husband says I must be healthy because my nose is so cold~

 

I do the multiple sock thing too. For me, the most important thing is not to ignore the symptoms of an attack. If I start feeling chilly, I'd better get up and do something about it or pay the consequences...

 

Various people have suggested the grain bags as wrist rests (try saying that one fast) when using the computer. You can do something similar too for the feet, as Shelley suggests. Because I also live in a cold climate and always have AND because I'm a real old-fashioned kind of gal (better than saying I'm just plain OLD), I'll stick some bricks in the bottom of my oven and warm them up. Wrapped in an old towel, they're great foot rests. The other thing I do is be careful about how I'm sitting so I don't risk cutting off the circulation to the feet. No more lotus position I guess!

 

Canon, would your terrier be willing to teach my border collies (3) how to warm feet? I'll pay your air fare!


Jeannie McClelland

(Retired) ISN Director of Support Services

(Retired) ISN Sclero Forums Manager

(Retired) ISN Blog Manager

(Retired) ISN Assistant News Guide

(Retired) ISN Artist

International Scleroderma Network

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My feet and hands are both bad. I started to get sores on my toes but then my husband and I took a vacation to the Cayman Islands for a week. The warmth did wonders for my feet and hands. They seemed to be a lot more swollen, but warm. Digging your feet into hot sand works great. I wish I could have stayed all winter.

 

We have been home for a week now and Kentucky has had a bad ice/snow storm. We lost our electric on Tuesday. The house has been staying in the fifties, and my poor hands and feet are bad again. My son and I went to the gym and took a hot shower last night. It was nice. I went to work today for a couple hours just to keep warm.

 

The problem I have with my feet is that anything too constricting cuts off my circulation and makes my feet worse. If my hands or feet get too warm, I get hot flashes and they are worse than cold numb hands or feet. It seems like I can't win. A couple time my feet got too hot in the Cayman Islands and I had to stand under cold water. :lol:

 

It seems crazy to me. Not only to I have Raynaud's but I also have the opposite of Raynaud's in warmer weather.

 

Keep warm everyone,

Nina Lynn

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Hi Jeanne,

 

My terrier is such a social butterfly she would love to fly out and teach your border collies to warm feet. She would also like to romp around a lot. When I was at the shelter choosing a dog, it was a toss up between the terrier or a border collie for me and the terrier won. She won because the manager at the shelter told me the border collie would jump my 4 foot fence. Well that was the first thing my terrier did when I got her home. She is a sweetheart though.

 

With gentle thoughts,

 

Judy


A happy heart is good medicine.

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