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Jeannie McClelland

O2 Home Fills

5 posts in this topic

The "helpful" man who refills my big liquid oxygen tank every two weeks is pushing hard for me to switch to the home fill/concentrator system. Does anybody have any experience of this and be willing to share pro's and con's?

 

He also told me today that because the liquid oxygen systems are so expensive, "soon only the people with the highest flow rates will be able to get liquid O2." Anybody else heard this? It sounded a bit off to me.

 

Hugs,


Jeannie McClelland

(Retired) ISN Director of Support Services

(Retired) ISN Sclero Forums Manager

(Retired) ISN Blog Manager

(Retired) ISN Assistant News Guide

(Retired) ISN Artist

International Scleroderma Network

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Hi Jeannie,

 

My mom actually has both. However, she will likely be moving to full-time liquid for the very reason you mentioned that your O2 supplier had told you. There are times now (before, as well as after) her very recent hospitalization...this past week), that she requires 6L of O2 and her liquid can only provide that.

 

She purchased the oxygen concentrator when she went on full-time oxygen.

 

PROs: It's nice, in that it's serviced once every three months to make sure it's operating at the optimum level. Hers also has the humidity reservoir (bottle), which keeps her nose from being so dry. It is disposable and I replace it weekly (the oxygen supply company brings those, as well as the cannulas/hose.

 

Because my mother has glaucoma and macular degeneration, I have them bring green oxygen hose, rather than the clear so she can keep track of them!

 

CONs: Her concentrator is an endless supply of O2, but when we lose electricity, we must then rely on the liquid oxygen, as we don't have a back-up power source. (That's when a generator would be really nice to have)!

 

Then, the liquid O2 is the ticket! Of course, when she DOES go to appointments, etc., it's very easy to fill her POC (personal O2 concentrator.) However, as you mentioned, not only IS it more costly, the oxygen supplier must come and fill it. Also, her home concentrator can only provide 5L of O2, whereas the liquid can provide higher O2 flow.

 

I sure hope I was able to answer your question(s), Jeannie.


Special Hugs,

 

Susie Kraft

ISN Support Specialist

ISN Chat Host

International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

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Jeannie,

susie provided a great list of pros and cons, but I'll add a couple more. I use the concentrator with a refill compressor unit on top so I can refill my portable bottles. That's what I love about this system the most! I have two small 3 lb tanks that I go out and about with and when one is empty I hook it up when I go to bed and it's full in the morning (it actually only takes an hour).

 

For me and the hubby, the major con is the noise, but we have solved that problem. Since I need continuous O2 when I sleep (but not when I'm running around the house), we have it in the room next to the bedroom. He ran a 50 foot hose through the bedroom to my side of the bed. At night we shut the room off to close off the noise. The older the machine gets, the louder it gets but with our system, we don't hear it.

 

I did buy one of those portable concentrators that are FAA approved. I haven't flown with it yet, but when we travel it's great! It is so small that taking into a hotel or someone's home is SO MUCH easier than the big one.

 

If you need more than 2L/m of continuous flow, the compressed O2 tanks won't work for you. They can go up to 6 on pulsed, but only 2 on continuous. Hopefully, you don't need more than that.

 

Big Hugs,


Janey Willis

ISN Support Specialist

(Retired) ISN Assistant Webmaster

(Retired) ISN News Director

(Retired) ISN Technical Writer for Training Manuals

International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

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I got a small portable oxygen concentrator last year and actually took it on a flight! Woohoo - it was great. The only problem was the good security folks at the airport. One laddie was all set to take it apart before his supervisor stepped in. :rolleyes: I think it's wonderful that as of June of this year all flights originating or landing in the USA must accept the FAA-approved portable oxygen concentrators.

 

Janey, is that 3lb. weight filled or empty? The fellow from the O2 company handed me the small cylinder in a nifty little back pack, empty of course, and I was really impressed with its light weight and the comfort of the back pack.

 

That's good to know the output (continuous vs. pulsed). If I'm not being overly athletic (big laughs everybody) at higher than our normal, I can get along quite comfortably at 2-3 L/PM pulsed.

 

Susie, we've not experienced any power outages in several years, hurrah. The O2 company swears they can get me same day emergency delivery of a big tank of O2.

 

Y'know, if my pulmonologist doesn't object, I think I'll go for it.

 

Thanks for the input! Well-oxygenated hugs to you both.


Jeannie McClelland

(Retired) ISN Director of Support Services

(Retired) ISN Sclero Forums Manager

(Retired) ISN Blog Manager

(Retired) ISN Assistant News Guide

(Retired) ISN Artist

International Scleroderma Network

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