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living linda

Raynaud's in feet

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I have had diffuse systemic scleroderma for a number of years but now I am encountering a new problem. My feet are beginning to have Raynaud's attacks. My fingers have always had them but I now have numb feet when shopping in stores or eating in restaurants. I know which ones to avoid or hurry through. It seems if I wear tight shoes like heels that it's worse. My feet also have such calluses on the toes. Any suggestions would be appreciated.

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Hi, Linda

 

Yes, it is possible (and common) to have Raynaud's attacks on the feet as well as hands and even other parts of the body as you will find on our main Raynaud's Main Menu page. Numbness and pain in the feet may not necessarily be attributed to Raynaud's though, especially since you mention that you have problems with callused toes. Make sure you are wearing comfortable shoes when you are out walking and that your socks also fit well and are dry. If your feet are warm before you put your well-fitting shoes and dry, well-fitting socks on, they are more likely to stay warm. You may want to carry a pair of warm socks in your bag to slip on if you are wearing sandals and find yourself in a highly air-conditioned restaurant.

 

I have had a lot of trouble transitioning from one season to another when it comes to shoes. :huh:


Warm wishes,

Jefa

 

Carrie Maddoux

(Retired)ISN Sclero Forums Support Specialist

(Retired)ISN Sclero Forums UK Chat Host

International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

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Hi Linda,

 

I too have Raynaud's in my feet, particularly after showering or walking barefoot on tile or hardwood. I try to avoid situations where my feet would be exposed, just like my hands. I wear fuzzy socks (sometimes two pairs) and shoes with linings to keep them warm. I also use a heated throw blanket almost year round since the key is to keep your core body warm.

 

Since I am also diabetic the circulation in my feet is not great, and my doctors all check my feet including that the pulse is strong.

Because I live in the north, cold weather is a serious problem for me, and I once had such a severe attack I actually passed out, so take your Raynaud's seriously!

 

Good luck,

 

Mary in Philly


Diffuse sclero; diabetes; hypertension; GERD with Barrett's

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Hi Linda,

 

I've got Raynaud's in my feet too. Mary and Jefa have both given you good tips. About the only other thing I can add is that I've found it useful to chose shoes that breath. Many of the synthetic materials found in the more trendy or cheaper shoes can make your feet really sweaty and then they chill more easily. I can get away with the plastic (I think) clog type of shoes because they are loose-fitting, ventilated, and I can put a nice thick pair of tennis socks on with them.

 

Warm hugs and a nice foot massage,


Jeannie McClelland

(Retired) ISN Director of Support Services

(Retired) ISN Sclero Forums Manager

(Retired) ISN Blog Manager

(Retired) ISN Assistant News Guide

(Retired) ISN Artist

International Scleroderma Network

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Linda,

 

Ditto on everything that's already been said. Unfortunately, if you really want to reduce the effects of Raynaud's toes, you might have to give up the heels. You need that circulation to the toes and heels don't help. Because of the Raynaud's in my feet I can only wear close toed, wide toed flats. If you don't have a little movement in the toes with your shoes on, then the chances of getting numb, white or purple toes can increase.

 

Big Hugs,


Janey Willis

ISN Support Specialist

(Retired) ISN Assistant Webmaster

(Retired) ISN News Director

(Retired) ISN Technical Writer for Training Manuals

International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

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Thank you for all the responses. Very useful ideas from people who know what I'm talking about. One suggestion was to use a heated throw. I live in the south where we get hot temperatures in the spring and summer, but I cannot make it without my heated throw year round. It seems air conditioning affects me more than cold. We visit our children up around Seattle fairly often, and I left a throw there. The first trip I packed it in my checked luggage and confused the poor checkers of luggage when it went through the scanner. All those wires!

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Yes, Raynaud's in the feet... count me in, too.

 

I also experience "color changes" in my feet, during and after showers. Mine blanch and then turn a grayish-blue, particularly the toes and heels.

 

I also find I have to be slow with increasing the water temperature, as it feels prickly on my feet as the water hits.

 

I just had to throw away some slippers I dearly loved because the soles were only cloth...they were big Sharpeis. My brother and sis-in-law had given them to me several years ago.

 

My feet are so hypersensitive, if I don't have good-fitting shoes on, my entire body hurts, along with my feet.

 

On the topic of warm slippers, my first husband's aunts always made what were called waffle slippers for the great-nieces/nephews each year. I loved them and always hoped they would make me a pair, but I could never bring myself to ask :unsure:

 

I let my mom-in-law know and she said, "I'm sure that the reason they never made you any is because they think they aren't good enough :o . At any rate, they have both since, passed away, so I need to locate some somehow!


Special Hugs,

 

Susie Kraft

ISN Support Specialist

ISN Chat Host

International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

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Hi,

At first I thought it was just not able to handle the cold.

 

I was taking ice skating lessons about 4+ years ago, I don't think I could do it now without the toe warmers.

 

Toe warmers they make for hunters/outdoors people are great! But they are made to be worn inside a shoe that doesn't get much air, or they get too hot and can burn you. I used them a lot this winter. What a lifesaver!!

 

I keep some charcoal warmers in the car now, just in case. My toes can turn white when I get out of the shower, but they don't seem as bad as the fingers.

 

I also get the burning hot and bright red, but almost always in the evening when I'm just relaxing. My hands will be on fire, red and hot, and of course they also start to swell. I even melted a candle at an evening church service one time, forming a nice J with it as I played with the soft wax.

 

My ears get this way too, yet I've yet to see my ears turn white or blue.

 

Mando.

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The bottoms of my feet burn at night. They feel like I have been walking on pavement barefoot maybe. Like right now. I have them covered in my soft socks with my feet up and they are hurting. I hope I am not getting neuropathy.

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Hi, Susie. I had to look up your waffle slipper reference to see what you were talking about and I discovered that there are quite a few sources for them online, so have a wee search.


Warm wishes,

Jefa

 

Carrie Maddoux

(Retired)ISN Sclero Forums Support Specialist

(Retired)ISN Sclero Forums UK Chat Host

International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

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Hi again Linda,

 

I agree that the heels might have to go except for very special occasions .... think of the stress they put on healthy feet, let alone compromised ones like ours. My podiatrist frowns on flip flops too, just so you know, she said they put our feet at higher risk because they are exposed, and because we have to kind of clench our toes when we walk in them. Be very careful of any breaks in your skin on your feet as they are at risk for infection as much as our fingers.

 

You don't mention if you have arthritic symptoms with the SSD. My fingers and toes are some of the worst joints affected in my body-my toes are twisting like my fingers, so also take that into consideration when it comes to pain.

 

At least you know you are not alone by a long shot!

 

Lots of luck,

 

Mary in Philly


Diffuse sclero; diabetes; hypertension; GERD with Barrett's

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I have Raynaud's in my feet too!! Definitely give up the heels if you can. I totally agree with everything else the ladies have said so far. Although, I do love my flip flops in the summer. Just be sure to cover up when you are out and about. When I know I am going shopping or to the supermarket, I always wear shoes or sneakers because you don't have control over the temperatures in the stores. In the hot summer days I like to wear my flips, so if we are planning to go out to dinner, I make sure I have a sweater and either a little blanket or towel I can cover my feet up with.

 

Hugs,

Lisa


Lisa Bulman

(Retired) ISN/SCTC List Coordinator

(Retired) ISN Sclero Forums Assistant Manager

(Retired) ISN Assistant News Guide

(Retired) ISN Fundraiser

International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

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I also have Raynaud's in my feet. Like others have mentioned they often are triggered by getting into the shower especially if it is a tiled surface, the toes go white & then change to dark purple before eventually going bright red. I have not worn heeled shoes for so long because my feet became so painful every time I put them.

 

Keep warm

 

Jensue

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I too have Raynaud's in my feet. I don't really have any good suggestions. Just watch your calluses to make sure they don't get infected. I know that my feet are numb so much that I can't always tell when I have hurt them. I know that I had a stress fracture in my foot that took 27 weeks to heal due to Raynaud's and poor blood supply.

Take care,

Nan

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