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MUFFINTOP

Any Serving Police or retired Officers with Sclero?

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Hi, I have been a Police officer for 11 years, anyone belonging to this organisation or similar will know that it is a difficult job to do at the best of times but your fighting your disease and the organisation from medically retiring you or putting you on unacceptable attendance reports after just 8 days sick per year.

 

I was diagnosed from a blood test in 04 with scleroderma antibody, luckily for me I have been very mild and can see that I must have had the condition at least ten years before it was picked up when I went to general practitioner because I was convinced that I had arthritis... my joints are affected and are getting progressively worse especially this stiffness in my ankles and hands tight and stiff in the mornings which I have only just identified others as having since I found this forum (this is a real lifesaver to be able to talk to others with the same condition.)

 

If anyone else has been in my job they will know how to advise me on how to deal with the systems, we all hang on for retirement at 55 or 25 years for fear of loosing our pensions. Oh by the way I'm female and 47.

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Hi Muffintop!

 

Welcome to Sclero Forums. We're such a wild bunch that we can always use another police officer around here!

 

Actually, Razz is a retired police officer, so I'm sure you'll be hearing from her.


Warm Hugs,

 

Shelley Ensz

Founder and President

International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

Hotline and Donations: 1-800-564-7099

 

The most important thing in the world to know about scleroderma is sclero.org.

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Welcome Muffintop,

Bookshelf comes into the chat room on Sunday evenings at 9. He has been dealing with where he was placed after returning to light duty. He may be able to answer some of your questions.


Strength and Warmth,

Sheryl

 

Sheryl Doom

ISN Support Specialist

(Retired) ISN Chat Moderator

International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

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Hi Muffintop and welcome!

 

Hopefully I can give you some advice and share my experience with you my fellow comrade.

 

I was working full time as a patrol officer in Chicago when I developed an aggressive form of systemic scleroderma. At the time I was experiencing numbing of my fingers in the winter of 1997. I chalked up this unusual sensation to the extreme cold weather and thought it was a temporary condition. That is until a few months later I developed tingling and painful swelling in my fingers, hands and feet. I realized this was becoming serious because being able to use our hands quickly and forcefully in our line of work is crucial. I made an appointment with a rheumatologist and was diagnosed with scleroderma within six months of my first symptoms. However the form of scleroderma I had or its development were unknown.

 

I read materials on this autoimmune disease hoping to gain insight on what to expect and how it would affect my life style and job. What I did read was discouraging. At first I was apprehensive about explaining my condition to my partners and even more to my superiors. I told my partners I had an autoimmune disease called scleroderma. It was a progressive condition that hardened the skin and caused arthritic stiffening of the joints. In systemic cases, the internal organs are affected. Since my condition was uncertain, I remained hopeful that my condition would be treatable and I could continue working as a police officer. My superiors were very understanding and encouraged me to continue working as long as I could. I was able to undergo testing and treatments without affecting my schedule because I worked the night shift.

 

Unfortunately, I developed an aggressive form of systemic scleroderma and had to go on disability within four months of giving my bosses notice of my diagnosis. During my medical leave my health did not improve and I had to take an early retirement.

 

My advice to you would be to talk to whichever superior you have a good relationship with and explain your medical condition. If a desk position is available, consider that an option so you can continue working towards your retirement.

 

Good luck and I am sure everything will work out for you! If you have any other questions you can send me a message which I will gladly respond to.

 

Best regards,

Razz


Live well, Laugh often, Love much

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Hi Muffintop,

 

I just wanted to join in on the Welcomes. I'm glad you found us - when I was diagnosed and came here for information, I had a whole series of Eureka! moments. They're also known as "Ah, so that's what that is! :lol:

 

Best wishes and warm hugs,


Jeannie McClelland

(Retired) ISN Director of Support Services

(Retired) ISN Sclero Forums Manager

(Retired) ISN Blog Manager

(Retired) ISN Assistant News Guide

(Retired) ISN Artist

International Scleroderma Network

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Hello Muffintop

 

Sorry for repeating myself here but my suggestions are much the same as in my reply to your previous post on the U.K. sub forum concerning avoiding early retirement.

 

It is likely that with your diagnosis you would be covered by the *DDA (disability discrimination act) which means your employer would have to make all reasonable adjustments to enable you to continue working. I realise this means having to address your actual illness with your superiors and undergo some sort of fit for work protocol but you will have to do this at some point anyway if your disease progresses.

 

You should have either a welfare or HR (human resources) person or even a union rep who can work along side you to make sure you are protected by the DDA and not penalised for being unable to do what "able bodied" people can. Also as previously suggested can the CAB (citizens advice bureau) come up with any help for you?

 

Take care.

 

*DDA status is ultimately determined by employment tribunal. Certain sick absences can be covered under the DDA and are not therefore counted against you in any running total under fit for work criteria.

(information from www.direct.gov.uk)


Amanda Thorpe

ISN Sclero Forums Senior Support Specialist

ISN Video Presentations Manager

ISN Blogger

(Retired) ISN Sclero Forums Assistant Manager

(Retired) ISN Email Support Specialist

International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

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Hello, I’ve been policing for 13 years now and living with Scleroderma  for 10 years - well, diagnosed. I hope everyday that I can make it my last 7 years, until retirement.  I have some good days and then some bad days.  It makes a big difference to have a supportive supervisor.  

 

I have been meeting more police officers with this disease.  I wonder if we can link it to our environmental stress? Has anyone attempted ? 

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Hi Keevie,

 

Welcome to Sclero Forums.  It's possible yours might be related to the general scleroderma cause category of "stress".  See Causes of Scleroderma on our main site. 

 

:hug-group:


Warm Hugs,

 

Shelley Ensz

Founder and President

International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

Hotline and Donations: 1-800-564-7099

 

The most important thing in the world to know about scleroderma is sclero.org.

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Hi Keevie,

 

Welcome to these forums!

 

I'm sorry to hear that you've been suffering with scleroderma for the last ten years, but pleased to hear that you've got a supportive supervisor. Shelley's given you a useful link to our medical pages on the Causes of Scleroderma, which I hope you'll find helpful and interesting.

 

I do hope that you're being treated by a listed scleroderma expert, as this complex disease does require specialist knowledge and expertise to deal with all it's little idiosyncrasies.

 

Kind regards,

 

 


Jo Frowde

ISN Board Member

ISN Secretary of the Board

ISN Assistant Webmaster

SD World Webmaster

ISN Sclero Forums Manager

ISN News Manager

ISN Hotline Support Specialist

International Scleroderma Network (ISN)

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Hi Muffintop and Keevie,

 

I was in a high pressure job; also I drove trucks in 48 states, Canada and a little of Mexico. I really enjoyed my job; there are not many jobs that while I was driving I got to enjoy seeing the sights.

 

I got my first million mile award back in the early eighties. In 2007 I only needed about 5000 miles to get a second award when I got a hard hit in the head,  but I think I had scleroderma a few years before that. I started having trouble pushing like I need to and most people can't believe I was getting sick. In 2007 I had a steele end of a securement strap hit me on the head. It fractured my skull and broke my neck and nose. I am alive from injuries from which I should have never lived, let alone driven back from Canada to South Dakota. The fatigue  was getting at me and the joint pain; my doctors did a lot of tests and  I have systemic diffuse scleroderma and a list of other things. I had to get a new driver's license and now I just have a plain old  license .

 

I feel for the job you do as it must be extremely difficult. I will keep you in my thoughts.

 

I am now disabled; I am back to quilting and making dolls clothes. The one thing I have to share is find a good therapist it helps, also a good attorney  to help with disability.

 

Now I am through I send you my blessings.

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On 5/18/2018 at 2:08 PM, Shelley Ensz said:

Hi Keevie,

 

Welcome to Sclero Forums.  It's possible yours might be related to the general scleroderma cause category of "stress".  See Causes of Scleroderma on our main site. 

 

:hug-group:

Thank you

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On 5/19/2018 at 1:10 AM, quiltfairy said:

Hi Muffintop and Keevie,

 

I was in a high pressure job; also I drove trucks in 48 states, Canada and a little of Mexico. I really enjoyed my job; there are not many jobs that while I was driving I got to enjoy seeing the sights.

 

I got my first million mile award back in the early eighties. In 2007 I only needed about 5000 miles to get a second award when I got a hard hit in the head,  but I think I had scleroderma a few years before that. I started having trouble pushing like I need to and most people can't believe I was getting sick. In 2007 I had a steele end of a securement strap hit me on the head. It fractured my skull and broke my neck and nose. I am alive from injuries from which I should have never lived, let alone driven back from Canada to South Dakota. The fatigue  was getting at me and the joint pain; my doctors did a lot of tests and  I have systemic diffuse scleroderma and a list of other things. I had to get a new driver's license and now I just have a plain old  license .

 

I feel for the job you do as it must be extremely difficult. I will keep you in my thoughts.

 

I am now disabled; I am back to quilting and making dolls clothes. The one thing I have to share is find a good therapist it helps, also a good attorney  to help with disability.

 

Now I am through I send you my blessings.

Thank you for sharing your story. That’s some major driving you use to do!! Talk about driving for yourself and everyone else.  That’s a lot of pressure and focus. I collect Barbie dolls now.

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Thank you everyone.  I’m so happy I found this site.  I go to George Town hospital for care; Dr. V. Steen is my doctor.  She says I have been in remission for the last year. It would be awesome; if it was just a miracle healing. I’m getting transfer into a new duty assignment soon -  let’s see how long that remission last.  :wink:

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2 hours ago, Keevie said:

Thank you for sharing your story. That’s some major driving you use to do!! Talk about driving for yourself and everyone else.  That’s a lot of pressure and focus. I collect Barbie dolls now.

That is funny, my grand daughter always wanted me to make new clothes for her Barbie.  I finally purchased her an American girlie 18 inch doll, much wiser to sew.

 

I have been to Chicago a number of times, mostly to the meat market. I remember the one way street; to get to the place we had to go on a wrong way as it was the only way to get there. You had to creep across the bridge coming back out or you would top out your trailer. The guy I was instructing peeled the top of the trailer back to feet; thanks to the officer, he gave the guy a written warning and it could have been a lot worse, as we both could be sitting behind bars and not the kind you drink in.

 

Thank you for for helping to bring to back so many good thoughts.

 

I will be thinking about you and I send you my blessings.

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