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Multiple Autoimmune Syndrome (MAS)

Author: Shelley Ensz. Scleroderma is highly variable. See Types of Scleroderma. Read Disclaimer

Multiple Autoimmune Syndrome (MAS) is the coexistence of three or more autoimmune diseases. At least one of them is usually a skin disease, such as psoriasis or scleroderma.

An unusual association of three autoimmune disorders: celiac disease (CD), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis. This case is unusual: the rare combination of the three autoimmune diseases, their appearance in a man and the atypical onset of the diseases with psychiatric symptoms likely to be related either to CD or to SLE. PubMed, Auto Immun Highlights, 2016 Dec;7(1):7. (Also see Lupus in Overlap, Celiac Disease and Hashimoto's Thyroiditis)

Familial Aggregation and Segregation Analysis in Families Presenting Autoimmunity, Polyautoimmunity, and Multiple Autoimmune Syndrome. Data suggest that polyautoimmunity and MAS are not independent traits and that gender, age, and age of onset are interrelated factors influencing autoimmunity. PubMed, J Immunol Res, 2015;2015:572353. (Also see Scleroderma in Overlap)

Novel and rare functional genomic variants in multiple autoimmune syndrome (MAS) and Sjögren's syndrome. The LRP1/STAT6 novel mutation has the strongest case for being categorised as potentially causative of MAS given the presence of intriguing patterns of functional interaction with other major genes shaping autoimmunity. PubMed, J Transl Med, 2015 Jun 2;13:173. (Also see Sjogren's Syndrome Research)

Psoriasis and concomitant fibrosing disorders: Lichen sclerosus, morphea, and systemic sclerosis. In this population, a predisposition toward autoimmunity is seen as 38.5% of patients had a personal history of a third concomitant autoimmune disease, in addition to psoriasis and fibrosing disorder, whereas 42.3% reported a history of a first-degree relative with an autoimmune disease. Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology. (Also see Psoriasis, Lichen Sclerosus, Morphea, and Systemic Sclerosis)

(Case Report) A rare association of localized scleroderma (LS) type morphea, vitiligo, autoimmune hypothyroidism, pneumonitis, autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura and central nervous system vasculitis. It is likely that localized scleroderma has an autoimmune origin and in this case becomes part of multiple autoimmune syndrome (MAS), which consist of the presence of three or more well-defined autoimmune diseases in a single patient. PubMed, BMC Res Notes. (Also see Causes of Morphea, Vitiligo, Hashimoto's Thyroiditis, Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura and Vasculitis)

Multiple Autoimmune Disease Genetics Consortium. MADGC is a group of leading genetic researchers who have joined efforts to identify and understand the genes that autoimmune diseases have in common. MADGC.

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